Photo by Harry Shunyao Zhang

event

[Virtual] "Cultivating Genius" Reading Group

Diana Crum

7:30pm – 8:45pm
January 27, 2021
FREE
  • This is a FREE event!
  • You can still join us if you weren't able to read Cultivating Genius by Gholdy Muhammad! Check out excerpts posted below and additional resources to inspire the discussion.
  • Movement Research will provide a Zoom room, a moderator, and a few guidelines for participating in the discussion. Then we’ll leave it to you to talk it out.

Calling all dance teachers! We need to talk. Like many systems that we’ve built, U.S. education is mired in white supremacy. Yikes! Let’s use Gholdy Muhammad’s research of Black literary societies of the 1800s to inspire some change.

We invite you to read Cultivating Genius by Gholdy Muhammad (published by Scholastic) before the event. If you don’t get to finish it (or even start it), that’s okay. You can still join us. We have some excerpts posted below and additional resources to inspire the discussion.

REGISTER HERE >>

Movement Research will provide a Zoom room, a moderator, and a few guidelines for participating in the discussion. Then we’ll leave it to you to talk it out.


Excerpts from Cultivating Genius to consider in groups:

“So, in this book, I intentionally group literacy learning in Black history and Black excellence as the conduit for framing excellence in education for students across all racial groups, ethnicities, and identities. If we start with Blackness (which we have not traditionally done in schooling) or the group of people who have uniquely survived the harshest oppressions in this country, then we begin to understand ways to get literacy education right for all.” (pg 22)

“To keep knowledge to one’s self was seen as a selfish act, and each person therefore was responsible to elevate others through education in the immediate and larger community. This ideal of collectivism is in direct conflict with schools today, as schools are largely grounded in competition and individualism.” (pg 26)

“Literacy was viewed as the means of building reading and writing skills and knowledge as well as the means to shape their identities and critical understandings of themselves, of communities, and of the world.” (pg 32)

Don’t know where to start the discussion? Below are some possible prompts and questions to consider:

  • How was Black history and excellence a part of your dance education? Where is it in your current classroom/studio/practice? Do you want to center it and, if so, how?
  • In dance education, are students responsible to elevate others? If so, how so? If not, should they be? Where is there space for collectivism in dance education?
  • What is dance literacy? How does it serve students?

For more of Gholdy Muhammad and a discussion about abolitionist teaching:

Click HERE to watch “Abolitionist Teaching and the Future of Our Schools,” presented by Haymarket Books, a conversation with Bettina Love, Gholdy Muhammad, Dena Simmons and Brian Jones about abolitionist teaching and antiracist education. >>

Learn more about Studies Project

Related Artists

Diana Crum

Diana is a choreographer, dancer, teacher, administrator and advocate. The roles overlap and inform one another. In addition to directing Dance Makers in the Schools, she currently teaches with ArtsConnection and New Jersey Performing Arts Cente...
READ MORE